Announcement

 

Peel the Limelight to follow their successful production of “Julia Pastrana” with Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer Prize winning and Off-Broadway hit play “How I Learned to Drive”, a story of love and sexual experience before the age of consent

 

Following their sold-out and critically acclaimed premiere of “The True History of the Tragic Life and Triumphant Death of Julia Pastrana, the Ugliest Woman in the World” by Shaun Prendergast last November, Peel the Limelight announce their second production of the season, Paula Vogel’s award-winning and Off-Broadway hit play “How I Learned to Drive”, promising the Bangkok audience yet another intimate and emotional theatrical experience.

“Li’l Bit has always felt like an outsider and no one in her dysfunctional family understands her, except Uncle Peck”, Artistic Director Peter O’Neill explained. “Set against the backdrop of a Driver’s Education course, this is a story of love and sexual experience before the age of consent”, he added.

“One of the most discomfiting love stories to emerge from the American theatre”, according to the New York Times, and winner of the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, Paula Vogel’s “How I Learned to Drive” confronts us with the cycle of abuse and challenges the audience to question whether, “All roads lead back home”!

The play had its Off-Broadway premiere at the Vineyard Theatre in 1997 and was revived at the Second Stage Theatre in 2012.

Elizabeth Reaser as Li'l Bit at the Second Stage Theatre

Elizabeth Reaser as Li'l Bit at the Second Stage Theatre

Directed by Peter O’Neill and produced by Jaime Zúñiga, the production stars (in order of appearance) Siree Riewpaiboon (Li’l Bit), James Laver (Uncle Peck), Nick Gallagher (Greek Male Chorus), Mandi Manson (1st Female Greek Chorus), and Claire Stanley (2nd Female Greek Chorus), with sets and costumes by Kochawan Chayawan and sound design by Surasak Kerdsin. 

Paula Vogel

Paula Vogel

“How I Learned to Drive” was written by American playwright and former chair of playwriting at Yale School of Drama, Paula Vogel. Her plays often deal with taboos and controversial subjects. She rose to fame with The Baltimore Waltz, a play inspired by the AIDS-related death of her brother Carl, which won her the Obie Award for Best Play in 1992. Other notable plays include Desdemona, A Play About A Handkerchief (1979), The Oldest Profession (1981), And Baby Makes Seven (1984), Hot 'N Throbbing (1994), and The Mineola Twins (1996).

The play will be performed in English with Thai surtitles from March 3rd to March 13th at the Spark Drama studio. Discounts for early bookings and students are available as well as special packages for schools interested in bringing groups of students.